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Publication Title | Journal of Automated Methods & Management in Chemistry, 2005 (2005), no. 3, 59–209

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Journal of Automated Methods & Management in Chemistry, 2005 (2005), no. 3, 59–209 ⃝c 2005HindawiPublishingCorporation

Abstracts of Papers Presented at the 2005 Pittsburgh Conference

Peter B. Stockwell

P S Analytical Ltd, Arthur House, Unit 3, Crayfields Industrial Estate, Main Road, St Pauls Cray, Orpington, Kent BR5 3HP, UK

To attend or not to attend, that is the question. The Pittsburgh Conference continues to pose this conundrum to conferees and exhibitors alike. This year’s conference was the first to be presented without a set of paper abstracts—a good thing some would say but this old codger always used the paper abstracts to select papers of interest to our readership and to seek a full publication. The exhibit took its usual format but it seemed that there were less manufacturers present. The information presented to the attendees was also lacking and many companies’ details were missing from the final program book, an omission no doubt on their behalf— my company was one of these—however I feel sure that past Pittcon organizers would have been more persistent in getting the required details for the audience. As is now the norm, many of the presentations take the form of posters displayed within the exhibition area. Without a driver to get the audience there, the traffic was slow, to say the least. Lecture presentations were also attended in a mixed fashion. So the Pittsburgh Conference show moves on, and again next year it will be held in Orlando from 12 March to 17 March 2006. No doubt I will be there making it a straight 31 in a row; in Pittsburgh Conference terms I am just a beginner with many of the attendees making more shows in a run than that. Selected abstracts dealing with topics of interest to the readers of this journal follow—hopefully many of these groups will be willing to publish their work either within this journal or elsewhere.

AUTOMATING LOWRY PROTEIN AND OTHER ASSAYS USING A PERSONAL AUTOMATED PIPETTING SYSTEM

Michael N. Sevigny

Bio-Tek Instruments, Inc, Highland Park, PO Box 998, Winooski, VT 05404

The most time-consuming aspect of conducting assays, such as the Lowry protein assay, is the pipetting required to cre- ate standard curves and sample dilutions. We will show how to utilize a “personal” precision TM XS automated pipet- ting system to mechanize the pipetting aspects, saving time and lab resources. The application of a small footprint mul- tichannel pipetting system that has a level-sensing single- channel pipette can greatly increase throughput in the typi- cal laboratory. Pipetting can be conducted to and from single tubes, bottles reagent troughs, 96- and 384-well microplates, or a variety of other labware. The device’s flexible platform layout with 1- and 8-channel pipette heads accommodates applications from single-well-hit picking to multiwell serial dilutions. Using carbon-filled tips the single-channel pipette is capable of liquid level sensing, allowing for transfer of sam- ple from unevenly filled sample tubes. Pipetting is highly ac- curate and precise. Dispense accuracy at 100 μL is within 2% with 2% CVs. We will describe the accuracy and precision of the single- and eight-channel dispensers. The accuracy and precision of samples and standards in a typical Lowry pro- tein assay will also be shown. Customized software provides

complete control of experimental design through an intuitive user interface. The use of a plate stacker, and more complete automation robotics, and interface software will also be out- lined. The paper will lead the user through the programing of sample preparation for a Lowry assay, in order to show how straightforward it is on the system.

Keywords: sample handling/automation, sample preparation Application code: bioanalytical

Methodology code: sampling and sample preparation

OPTICAL BIOSNIFFER FOR METHYL MERCAPTAN VAPOR

Kohji Mitsubayashi,* Takeshi Minamide, and Hirokazu Saito

*Institute of Biomaterials and Bioengineering, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 2-3-10 Kanda-Surugadai,

Tokyo 101-0062, Japan

Halitosis evaluation is important in the medical and dental fields, but there are no convenient devices with high gas se- lectivity for their diagnoses. Methyl mercaptan (MM) is one of typical causations for halitosis. But it has not been re- ported a gas sensor, that is, simple and convenient to use and could selectively detect the MM. On the other hand, a monoamine oxidase type A (MAO-A, one of xenobiotic- metabolizing enzymes) is reported to catalyze the oxidation

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